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Report writing - Case Study

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❶With the patient in the supine position, static palpation revealed tender trigger points bilaterally in the cervical musculature and right trapezius. Discuss your case study in relation to the current literature on other similar cases.

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Upon undertaking this work, I will conduct extensive research in this area and have credible sources and references. I am a good writer More. The email address is already associated with a Freelancer account. Enter your password below to link accounts: I forgot my password. The purpose of this assessment is: Details please read carefully Using the following two 2 steps, outlined below, prepare a short report that addresses the issues raised in the case study, and provide a recommendation.

Reports that are presented using a simple question and answer format will not earn high marks. Step 1 Select a minimum of ten 10 peer reviewed journal articles dealing with topics or issues raised in the case study. Step 2 Prepare a report in short format and follow the instructions outlined in the sections below. The body of your report can be structured in three 3 sections. For example, ask yourself questions such as: You can begin to plan the report while you are investigating the case.

Fist, prepare an outline in list or mind-map format of the main headings and subheadings you will have in the report.

Then add notes and ideas to the outline which remind you of what you want to achieve in each section and subsection. Use the outline to help you consider what information to include, where it should go and in what sequence.

Be prepared to change your outline as your ideas develop. Finally, the outline headings and subheadings can be converted into the contents page of your report. Prepare a schedule for writing and editing the sections of the report. Allow some extra time just in case you find some sections difficult to write. Begin by writing the sections you feel most confident about. Preliminary sections executive summary, introduction and supplementary sections conclusions, reference list and appendices are usually prepared last.

Some writers like to begin with their conclusions where the writer's thoughts are at that moment or the methodology it's easier to write about your own work. In writing a case study report in your course, the report is often intended for an imaginary person so you need to make sure that your language and style suites that person.

For example, a report for senior management will be different in content and style and language to a technical report. A report to a community group would also be different again in content, style and language. Audience definition helps you decide what to include in the report based on what readers need to know to perform their jobs better or what the readers need to know to increase their knowledge about your subject. These notes on audience analysis are adapted from Huckin and Olsen p Writers rarely produce a perfect piece of text in their first attempt so a number of drafts are usually produced.

Careful planning and editing will ensure a consistent professional standard in the report. You will need to do the following:. Do this by keeping both the reader's needs and the report's objectives in mind as you gather information, take notes and write sections of the report. Do this by taking clear notes, which include the information gathered and your thoughts about the usefulness and the implications of this information.

Review your notes to decide what is essential information to include in the report. Use your contents page outline to decide where information will go. Within each section, plan the subheadings and then decide on the sequence of information within these.

Check that your writing flows and that your ideas are supported and plausible. If you are not sure what to look for, here are links to advice and activities on report organisation, cohesion and evidence. Ensure that all your figures and tables communicate a clear message. Show a colleague your visuals to check how they will be interpreted or 'read'. For first drafts, a word processor's spell checker and grammar checker can be useful however, do not rely solely on these tools in your final edit as they are not perfect.

Errors will be overlooked or even created by these programs! The best ways to edit are to read a printed copy and where possible get a colleague to read and give feedback.

Here is a report checklist that you can print out: The reference list is a list of all the sources you refer to in the report. If you do not reference sources of information, your assignment could be failed.

As you read and take notes remember to collect the following information so that you can easily and quickly assemble your reference list.

Further advice on the conventions for formatting reference lists and 'in text' references can be found at The Learning Centre's online resources. Check your course requirements on the content and layout of the title page. As a general rule include the following:. At this stage it is best if you can leave the report for a day or so before conducting a final proof-read.

This assists you to approach your report as a 'reader' rather than as the 'writer' so you will more easily see errors. Hence, it is possible to work section by section through the template to quickly produce a first draft of your study. To begin with, however, you must have a clear sense of the value of the study which you wish to describe.

Therefore, before beginning to write the study itself, you should gather all of the materials relevant to the case — clinical notes, lab reports, x-rays etc. Another important general rule for writing case studies is to stick to the facts.

A case study should be a fairly modest description of what actually happened. Speculation about underlying mechanisms of the disease process or treatment should be restrained. Field practitioners and students are seldom well-prepared to discuss physiology or pathology. This is best left to experts in those fields. The thing of greatest value that you can provide to your colleagues is an honest record of clinical events. Editorial or promotional remarks do not belong in a case study, no matter how great our enthusiasm.

It is best to simply tell the story and let the outcome speak for itself. In addition, patient consent to publish the case report is also required.

The distinction between migraine and cervicogenic headache is not always clear. However, this case demonstrates several features …. Summarize the case and any lessons learned: This case demonstrates a classical presentation of cervicogenic headache which resolved quickly with a course of spinal manipulation, supportive soft-tissue therapy and postural advice. Vertebrogenic hearing deficit, the spine and spinal manipulation therapy: Chiropr J Aust ; Intensity of headaches as recorded on a visual analogue scale vertical axis versus time horizontal axis during the four weeks that the patient was under care.

Treatment was given on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, 22 and Headache frequency and intensity is seen to fall over time. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. J Can Chiropr Assoc. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Open in a separate window. Introduction Case studies are an invaluable record of the clinical practices of a profession. Additional and useful resources for chiropractic case studies include: Single subject research designs.

J Can Chirop Assoc ; 35 2: J Can Chiropr Assoc ; 51 2: General Instructions This set of guidelines provides both instructions and a template for the writing of case reports for publication.

The title page will contain the full title of the article. Remember that many people may find our article by searching on the internet. They may have to decide, just by looking at the title, whether or not they want to access the full article. A title which is vague or non-specific may not attract their attention. The two most common formats of titles are nominal and compound.

Other contents for the title page should be as in the general JCCA instructions to authors. Remember that for a case study, we would not expect to have more than one or two authors. In order to be listed as an author, a person must have an intellectual stake in the writing — at the very least they must be able to explain and even defend the article. Someone who has only provided technical assistance, as valuable as that may be, may be acknowledged at the end of the article, but would not be listed as an author.

If there is more than one author, one author must be identified as the corresponding author — the person whom people should contact if they have questions or comments about the study. Provide key words under which the article will be listed. These are the words which would be used when searching for the article using a search engine such as Medline. When practical, we should choose key words from a standard list of keywords, such as MeSH Medical subject headings.

A copy of MeSH is available in most libraries. A narrative abstract consists of a short version of the whole paper. There are no headings within the narrative abstract. The author simply tries to summarize the paper into a story which flows logically. A structured abstract uses subheadings. Structured abstracts are becoming more popular for basic scientific and clinical studies, since they standardize the abstract and ensure that certain information is included.

This is very useful for readers who search for articles on the internet. Often the abstract is displayed by a search engine, and on the basis of the abstract the reader will decide whether or not to download the full article which may require payment of a fee. With a structured abstract, the reader is more likely to be given the information which they need to decide whether to go on to the full article, and so this style is encouraged.

The JCCA recommends the use of structured abstracts for case studies.

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Thus, our title should contain the phrase “case study,” “case report” or “case series” as is appropriate to the contents. The two most common formats of titles are nominal and compound. A nominal title is a single phrase, for example “A case study of hypertension which responded to spinal manipulation.”.

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In writing a case study report in your course, the report is often intended for an imaginary person so you need to make sure that your language and style suites that person. For example, a report for senior management will be different in content and style and language to a technical report.

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Guidelines for Writing a Case Study Analysis. A case study analysis requires you to investigate a business problem, examine the alternative solutions, and propose the most effective solution using supporting evidence. In these sections, you will find a Case Study Report Template, a Sample Paper, and the Structure of a Case Study. Each part of the guide will engage you in a variety of ways to help you develop greater confidence and skill writing case study reports.

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Report Writing Projects for $30 - $ Length: words Objectives: Case study Report writing The Executive Summary, Lists of Contents and References are not included in the required word length. Required The Challenges of My First Job a. A case study is one of the many kinds of written assignments that you have to face throughout your college years. It is your report about a person, a group of people, a .