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How to Write a Scientific Research Paper

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❶Support every statement you make with evidence. A citation is just the name of the author and the date of the publication placed in parentheses like this:

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Scientific Paper Example
Scientific Research Paper

There are many important aspects on how to write a scientific research paper. And that is why before a student can start working on the academic assignment itself, he or she should learn what it consists of , what the main peculiarities of it are, and what mistakes to avoid.

Before searching how to write a science research paper, it is vital to know its contents. In general, each task has eight sections: Here you state the goal of the work, tasks and a thesis statement, methods that were used during the study, results as well as discussions.

All of them have a commonly used name IMRaD , and they are an obligatory part of custom research paper that must be written first than others. Not considering the structure of the text, many students make common mistakes when they start creating it. Unfortunately, all of them can lead to certain problems. To make a paper readable Print or type using a 12 point standard font, such as Times, Geneva, Bookman, Helvetica, etc.

Stay focused on the research topic of the paper Use paragraphs to separate each important point except for the abstract Indent the first line of each paragraph Present your points in logical order Use present tense to report well accepted facts - for example, 'the grass is green' Use past tense to describe specific results - for example, 'When weed killer was applied, the grass was brown' Avoid informal wording, don't address the reader directly, and don't use jargon, slang terms, or superlatives Avoid use of superfluous pictures - include only those figures necessary to presenting results Title Page Select an informative title as illustrated in the examples in your writing portfolio example package.

Abstract The summary should be two hundred words or less. See the examples in the writing portfolio package. General intent An abstract is a concise single paragraph summary of completed work or work in progress. Writing an abstract Write your summary after the rest of the paper is completed. Purpose of the study - hypothesis, overall question, objective Model organism or system and brief description of the experiment Results, including specific data - if the results are quantitative in nature, report quantitative data; results of any statistical analysis shoud be reported Important conclusions or questions that follow from the experiment s Style: Single paragraph, and concise As a summary of work done, it is always written in past tense An abstract should stand on its own, and not refer to any other part of the paper such as a figure or table Focus on summarizing results - limit background information to a sentence or two, if absolutely necessary What you report in an abstract must be consistent with what you reported in the paper Corrrect spelling, clarity of sentences and phrases, and proper reporting of quantities proper units, significant figures are just as important in an abstract as they are anywhere else Introduction Your introductions should not exceed two pages double spaced, typed.

General intent The purpose of an introduction is to aquaint the reader with the rationale behind the work, with the intention of defending it. Writing an introduction The abstract is the only text in a research paper to be written without using paragraphs in order to separate major points. Describe the importance significance of the study - why was this worth doing in the first place?

Provide a broad context. Defend the model - why did you use this particular organism or system? What are its advantages? You might comment on its suitability from a theoretical point of view as well as indicate practical reasons for using it. State your specific hypothesis es or objective s , and describe the reasoning that led you to select them. Very briefy describe the experimental design and how it accomplished the stated objectives. Use past tense except when referring to established facts.

After all, the paper will be submitted after all of the work is completed. Organize your ideas, making one major point with each paragraph. If you make the four points listed above, you will need a minimum of four paragraphs.

Present background information only as needed in order support a position. The reader does not want to read everything you know about a subject. As always, pay attention to spelling, clarity and appropriateness of sentences and phrases. Materials and Methods There is no specific page limit, but a key concept is to keep this section as concise as you possibly can. People will want to read this material selectively.

The reader may only be interested in one formula or part of a procedure. Materials and methods may be reported under separate subheadings within this section or can be incorporated together.

General intent This should be the easiest section to write, but many students misunderstand the purpose. Writing a materials and methods section Materials: Describe materials separately only if the study is so complicated that it saves space this way.

Include specialized chemicals, biological materials, and any equipment or supplies that are not commonly found in laboratories. Do not include commonly found supplies such as test tubes, pipet tips, beakers, etc.

If use of a specific type of equipment, a specific enzyme, or a culture from a particular supplier is critical to the success of the experiment, then it and the source should be singled out, otherwise no. Materials may be reported in a separate paragraph or else they may be identified along with your procedures.

In biosciences we frequently work with solutions - refer to them by name and describe completely, including concentrations of all reagents, and pH of aqueous solutions, solvent if non-aqueous. See the examples in the writing portfolio package Report the methodology not details of each procedure that employed the same methodology Describe the mehodology completely, including such specifics as temperatures, incubation times, etc. To be concise, present methods under headings devoted to specific procedures or groups of procedures Generalize - report how procedures were done, not how they were specifically performed on a particular day.

If well documented procedures were used, report the procedure by name, perhaps with reference, and that's all. For example, the Bradford assay is well known. You need not report the procedure in full - just that you used a Bradford assay to estimate protein concentration, and identify what you used as a standard.

It is awkward or impossible to use active voice when documenting methods without using first person, which would focus the reader's attention on the investigator rather than the work.

Therefore when writing up the methods most authors use third person passive voice. Use normal prose in this and in every other section of the paper — avoid informal lists, and use complete sentences.

What to avoid Materials and methods are not a set of instructions. Omit all explanatory information and background - save it for the discussion.

Omit information that is irrelevant to a third party, such as what color ice bucket you used, or which individual logged in the data. Results The page length of this section is set by the amount and types of data to be reported. Continue to be concise, using figures and tables, if appropriate, to present results most effectively. See recommendations for content, below. General intent The purpose of a results section is to present and illustrate your findings.

Content Summarize your findings in text and illustrate them, if appropriate, with figures and tables. When you work hard to write something, you don't want your friends to loaf and just copy it. Every author feels the same way. Plagiarism is when someone copies the words, pictures, diagrams, or ideas of someone else and presents them as his or her own.

When you find information in a book, on the Internet, or from some other source, you MUST give the author of that information credit in a citation. If you copy a sentence or paragraph exactly, you should also use quotation marks around the text.

The surprising thing to many students is how easy it is for parents, teachers, and science fair judges to detect and prove plagiarism. So, don't go there, and don't make us try to hunt you down! Here is information on how to format your research paper. Here is a sample research paper in MLA format.

You can find this page online at: You may print and distribute up to copies of this document annually, at no charge, for personal and classroom educational use. When printing this document, you may NOT modify it in any way.

For any other use, please contact Science Buddies. Log In Join for Free. Support for Science Buddies provided by:. Key Info As you do your research, follow your background research plan and take notes from your sources of information. These notes will help you write a better summary. The purpose of your research paper is to give you the information to understand why your experiment turns out the way it does.

The research paper should include: The history of similar experiments or inventions Definitions of all important words and concepts that describe your experiment Answers to all your background research plan questions Mathematical formulas, if any, that you will need to describe the results of your experiment For every fact or picture in your research paper you should follow it with a citation telling the reader where you found the information.

A citation is just the name of the author and the date of the publication placed in parentheses like this: Its purpose is to document a source briefly, clearly, and accurately. If you copy text from one of your sources, then place it in quotation marks in addition to following it with a citation. Be sure you understand and avoid plagiarism!

Do not copy another person's work and call it your own.

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Writing a research manuscript is an intimidating process for many novice writers in the sciences. One of the stumbling blocks is the beginning of the process and creating the first draft. This paper presents guidelines on how to initiate the writing process and draft each section of a research manuscript.

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Scientific research articles provide a method for scientists to communicate with other scientists about the results of their research. A standard format is used for these articles, in which the author presents the research in an orderly, logical manner.

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Apr 06,  · How do I write a scientific review research paper? I have written a few review papers, and this is my approach. There are doubtless others that are equally effective, and some of these will be faster, but the approach that I will suggest is one that is thorough and defensible. HOW TO WRITE AN EFFECTIVE RESEARCH PAPER • Getting ready with data • First draft • Structure of a scientific paper • Selecting a journal • Submission • Revision and galley proof Disclaimer: The suggestions and remarks in this presentation are based on personal research experience. Research practices and approaches vary.

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Students who have faced some difficulties in writing their academic papers may contact our writing experts to get entire information how to write scientific papers. A scientific paper is a paper that is written for scientists by scientists - or, in case of student writers, for scientists by student scientists. Feb 21,  · Expert Reviewed. How to Write a Scientific Paper. Five Parts: Formatting the Paper Writing the Sections Making the Figures and Tables Citing Your Sources Properly Sample Paper Community Q&A Even if you are not planning to publish a scientific paper, you may be asked to write in this format for a college course or other program%(53).